Seal strangled by plastic disc
News

Poor Seals strangled by plastic waste around Their necks

Seals strangled by plastic litter from Zeeland waters in the Netherlands.

On the Zeeland coast in the Netherlands two dead seals have been washed up. The seals died by being entangled in plastic waste.  Plastic waste is littering our oceans and threatening the lives of marine animals. Many seals strangled by plastic died because of this deadly environmental concern.



The First Aid for Sea Mammals posted a message yesterday on Facebook. In Ouddorp a dead seal washed up with a frisbee around the neck and at the Brouwersdam another with a head entangled in a piece of fishing net. The seal was also almost decapitated.

At the sancuary in Pieterburen and at Ecomare, seals have recently been brought in that were entangled in plastic. “They were still alive.”


more plastic in the ocean. Often, the seals strangled by plastic waste do not survive. luckily, this seal was saved from the plastic waste

tiewraps

Often the animals swim somewhere when they are young and get entangled in plastic. Plastic neither rots nor biodegrades, the plastic remains in place as the seals get older, growing tighter and tighter as they grow.

Another problem is that the seals carry microplastics they are at the top of the food chain, so they ingest all the plastic inside of the fish they eat.

Plastic waste affects the whole marine ecosystem, from plankton up to whales, unnecessarily killing and maiming millions of birds , fish, dolphins, turtles and seals that either eat it or become entangled in it.



Plastic litter in the sea is a big enviromental concern. It is not uncommon for  lighters, slippers, balloons, cups, tiewraps, pieces of rope or particles of life buoys to find their way into our sea's and oceans.

To give an impression: a so-called sack of 2 by 2 meters is completely full after a day of cleaning a small piece of beach. Every year we produce around 250 million tons of plastic. How did this plastic revolution begin and are there solutions to undo its environmental consequences?